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Can I pipe my downspout to the alley?
What standard is the storm drainage system built?
Who should I contact to report an incident?
What can't I put down the Storm Drain System?
What are dry and wet ponds?
Can I block or fill in the concrete swale inside my fence?
What about water from my hot tub or swimming pool?
Can I still wash my vehicle in the driveway or street?
Why do we have Ponds in our neighbourhoods?
How is stormwater different from wastewater?
What is the Storm Sewer System?
Who should I contact to report an incident?
What is a Catchbasin?
Why do we need a Storm Drainage Bylaw?
How does the Drainage Bylaw affect City Residents?
How are upgrades to the storm drainage system financed?
What happens if you don't comply with the Drainage Bylaw?
Q: Can I pipe my downspout to the alley?
A:
The Storm Sewers and Storm Drainage Bylaw C-1241 (9) requires downspouts to end at least two metres away from any City sidewalk, reserve, road, park, alley, lane or surface drainage facility. The two metre buffer zone permits some of the run-off to absorb into the ground rather than enter the storm system. This also helps avert icing on sidewalks and lanes in winter.

Downspouts should never be connected to the weeping tile of your house or building. This increases the risk of basement flooding.
Q: What standard is the storm drainage system built?
A:
Grande Prairie's underground storm-drainage pipes are designed to deal with low-intensity rainfalls which are the majority of what we receive. The underground pipes meet the North American Standard of draining one-in-five-year storms. The Grande Prairie airport gets about 450 millimetres (2/3 inch) of rainfall in one hour is a one-in-five year storm and a storm-drainage system that is designed for one-in-five year rainfalls can control 80% of the storms.

For detailed information on Alberta's legislation/Guidelines visit http://aep.alberta.ca/
Q: Who should I contact to report an incident?
A:

To report a incident please contact the Citizen Contact Centre at 780-538-0300. 

Q: What can't I put down the Storm Drain System?
A:
Prohibited material are any substance that may, directly or indirectly, obstruct the flow of water within the Storm Drainage System or that may have a negative impact on the receiving waters.

Prohibited materials are, but is not limited to:

•soil, sediment, waste or other solid material;
•fecal mater, animal waste, dead animals or animal parts;
•cooking oils and greases, soaps or detergents;
•gasoline, motor oil, transmission fluid, and antifreeze;
•solvents, paint; cement or concrete wastes;
•water from hot tubs;
•sawdust, wood, fibreboard or construction material;
•yard waste;
•pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers;
•hazardous, industrial, or biomedical waste;
Q: What are dry and wet ponds?
A:
Dry and Wet ponds hold water that exceeds the capacity of the underground storm-drainage pipes.

Dry Pond:

•hold water only during and shortly after rainfalls.
•fill with water in heavy downpours and drain slowly.
•have gentle slopes at the edges.
•have signs that warn people about flooding during rain storms
•can have playing fields in it
•about 13 ponds in the city are dry ponds

Wet Pond:

•always has water in it however the water will get deeper during a storm
•the quality of the water is improved by removing solids through sedimentation
•about 12 ponds in the city are wet ponds
Q: Can I block or fill in the concrete swale inside my fence?
A:
Components of the surface drainage system include paved walkways and grassed or concrete drainage courses (swales). The Bylaw C-1241 (13) requires that the surface drainage be kept clear of debris and obstructions at all times. Retaining walls, terraces, gardens, or sheds cannot be constructed or placed in these areas. These systems are designed to carry rainwater and any obstructions could contribute to flooding during a heavy rainstorm. Concrete swales commonly run along the back or side of residential properties. If a fence is built over a concrete swale, there must be at least 0.15 meters (6 inches) of clearance between the bottom of the fence and the top of the swale.
Q: What about water from my hot tub or swimming pool?
A:
Usually the water contains toxic disinfectants and chemicals that control algae. Even if water tests show that these chemicals are depleted, they remain in the water as a variety of toxic compounds. The City recommends that water from hot tubs and larger pools is drained or pumped to a household sink, toilet or floor drain connected to the sewer system.
Q: Can I still wash my vehicle in the driveway or street?
A:
The City recommends using a commercial car wash to clean your vehicle. Water from commercial car washes is discharged to the City's wastewater treatment facility where the wastewater is cleaned and treated before being returned to the river. If you do wash your vehicle in the driveway or street, do not use soap. Even biodegradable soaps will cause harm to living things in the river. Use only water and ensure that dirt or oil from your vehicle does not get washed down the storm drain.
Q: Why do we have Ponds in our neighbourhoods?
A:
Prior to an area being developed, rainwater easily soaks into soils, is absorbed by vegetation, is evaporated into the air or travels over land to receiving wetlands, creeks and river. When an area is developed with buildings, driveways, roads and sidewalks, the rain can not readily soak into the soil and journeys over and around these solid surfaces as runoff, reaching a waterway much faster. With no stormwater ponds, a large volume of water would enter a stream all at once, causing flooding and bank erosion. Runoff also collects assorted pollutants and debris as it flows over these surfaces, resulting in polluted water. Stormwater ponds are built to temporary hold this water then slowly release it back to the waterway, imitating the natural runoff rate and quality before development occurred. Wet ponds are critical in reducing the sediment that enters the river system, which can become a major threat to aquatic life.
Q: How is stormwater different from wastewater?
A:
Stormwater is the water from rainstorms, lawn watering or melting snow. Wastewater is the "used" water that drains from toilets, sinks, household, and some industrial drains.
Q: What is the Storm Sewer System?
A:
The storm sewer system is a network of sewers, ponds, ditches and wetlands that transport storm water to the Bear Creek and eventually to the Wapiti River. Stormwater does not undergo the same treatment process as wastewater so it is important to prevent pollutants from entering the system and damaging the water ecosystem. The main purpose of the storm drainage system is to prevent flooding.
Q: Who should I contact to report an incident?
A:
It is important that you report any/all spills or discharge of prohibited materials whether accidental or intentional.

If the release creates an immediate danger to public health and safety, call 9-1-1 for the fire department Hazardous Materials Team to respond.

For other violations and incidents, please report them to City of Grande Prairie Public Works Transportation Maintenance Department at 780-538-0354
Q: What is a Catchbasin?
A:
Catchbasins are the main access point for storm water to get into the underground pipe system. The metal grates that are visual at the edge of the road are only a part of the catchbasin structure. Under the side walk is a barrel that collects water as well. The barrel is attached to a pipe which water flows away in.
Q: Why do we need a Storm Drainage Bylaw?
A:
The Bylaw is needed to regulate Storm Sewers and Storm Drainage within the City of Grande Prairie to preserve and protect the Bear River water quality and ecosystem.
Q: How does the Drainage Bylaw affect City Residents?
A:
Prior to disposing of water in storm drains, residents are encouraged to stop and think about what chemicals and other materials are in the water that could harm the river environment.

Only clean water should be put into storm drains. If the disposal water contains other substances it should be put into the sewer system through household drains or allowed to run-off on the ground to prevent the water from entering a storm drain directly.
Q: How are upgrades to the storm drainage system financed?
A:
The storm-drainage system is supported by the mill rate (property taxes). Major improvement projects to the storm sewer systems are currently financed through the Alberta Municipal Infrastructure Grant. Funding in future budgets for major Storm Drainage projects have been assigned to the Municipal Sustainability Initiative Grant
Q: What happens if you don't comply with the Drainage Bylaw?
A:
Failure to comply with the Drainage Bylaw can result in fines ranging from $75 to $ 10,000 and/or the cost of containment and clean up. See schedule "A" of Bylaw